Gift of Confusion

Article from our new sister website http://www.giftofconfusion.org

……Confusion or the feeling of being lost or stuck are not necessarily bad places to be. In a world that seems to praise being right and certain above all else it is easy for us to feel uncomfortable with confusion but if we embrace it, welcome it and pay attention to the nudges it creates in one direction or another we can use it as a signpost toward a better outcome. Confusion can be a huge opportunity for learning and growth. It is not a weakness. As long as we use it to listen to the questions it forces us to ask ourselves and take heed of the answers it can be a profound strength. In essence, confusion is simply an invitation to change. An invitation to be more flexible between what our rational mind may decide it ‘wants’ and what the heart whispers that it ‘needs’. It is an invitation to step back and embrace the unfolding nature of life…..

https://www.giftofconfusion.org/articles/article-2-how-it-started-gift-of-confusion?fbclid=IwAR3DOZlfG178TUPCJQkl8lSNLjQD06GjyMcjnVqH3vPMbYiDdByJOqMMrYY

 

Embrace Uncertainty

Accept that you are confused. Accept the uncertainty, embrace the mystery, and love the part of you that doesn’t understand.

If we come to a place where we find peace in not knowing why something has happened, yet we know that it inevitably is making us stronger, happier, clearer or raising us to new levels of understanding, we are able to navigate through situations with a much happier outlook.

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The mythic mind ( Mythos) ponders metaphysical questions while the logical mind (Logos) counts the beans and weighs the odds.

Logos refers to our ordinary way of seeing the world with deductive, logical thinking that helps us balance our checkbook, make decisions, and plan for the future. But as scholar Karen Armstrong describes, the ancients saw that logos cannot “assuage human grief or find ultimate meaning in life’s struggle. For that people turned to mythos, stories that made no pretensions to historical accuracy but should rather be seen as an early form of psychology.

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