Courage is the opposite of Apathy

…..We can steer the ship of our life and even summon the wind and change its direction, but to do so requires quiet acts of courage. It requires letting go of the need to move the winds for our own purposes and instead choose to move them for the greater good of all….

ONE TUSK

COURAGEWhen we throw cold water on every opportunity life offers us for fixing a situation, we exhaust ourselves and everyone around us. When we’re apathetic, we have an endless string of excuses for why we can’t act. The people who love and want to support us burn out and avoid us because they can’t stand hearing yet another reason for why we have no power to change our lives. Courage is the opposite of Apathy.

View original post 164 more words

The Main Strand of Greatness

Magnanimity is loftiness of character or action. It is that elevation or dignity of soul which raises the possessor above revenge and makes him delight in acts of benevolence. Which makes him disdain injustice and meanness and prompts him to sacrifice personal ease, interest and safety for the accomplishment of useful and noble objects .  A man of magnanimity is elevated in sentiment, scorns temptations, what is mean and base and despises  earthly pomp and splendour.

– Swamy Sivananda

So why do we spend so much of our limited time on this earth focusing on all the things our eulogy will never cover?

Have you noticed that when we die, our eulogies celebrate our lives very differently from the way society defines success?

It’s easy, in effect, to miss the real point of our lives even as we’re living them. Until we’re no longer alive. A eulogy is often the first formal marking down of what our lives were about—the foundational document of our legacy.

Our eulogies are always about the other stuff: what we gave, how we connected, how much we meant to our family and friends, small kindnesses, lifelong passions, and the things that made us laugh.

Living the best version of our Eulogy

So why do we spend so much of our limited time on this earth focusing on all the things our eulogy will never cover?

“Eulogies aren’t résumés, they describe the person’s care, wisdom, truthfulness and courage. They describe the million little moral judgments that emanate from that inner region.”

– David Brooks

Even for those who die with amazing Wikipedia entries, whose lives were synonymous with accomplishment and achievement, their eulogies focus mostly on what they did when they weren’t achieving and succeeding. They aren’t bound by our current, broken definition of success….

Whether you believe in an afterlife—as I do—or not, by being fully present in your life and in the lives of those you love, you’re not just writing your own eulogy; you’re creating a very real version of your afterlife. It’s an invaluable lesson—one that has much more credence while we have the good fortune of being healthy and having the energy and freedom to create a life of purpose and meaning. The good news is that each and every one of us still has time to live up to the best version of our eulogy.

Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder – Arianna Huffington

FEAR By Khalil Gibran

It is said that before entering the sea
a river trembles with fear.

She looks back at the path she has traveled,
from the peaks of the mountains,
the long winding road crossing forests and villages.

And in front of her,
she sees an ocean so vast,
that to enter
there seems nothing more than to disappear forever.

But there is no other way.
The river can not go back.

Nobody can go back.
To go back is impossible in existence.

The river needs to take the risk
of entering the ocean
because only then will fear disappear,
because that’s where the river will know
it’s not about disappearing into the ocean,
but of becoming the ocean.