The more comfortable we become with being stupid, the deeper we will wade into the unknown

2photo.ru“Productive stupidity means being ignorant by choice. Focusing on important questions puts us in the awkward position of being ignorant. One of the beautiful things about science is that it allows us to bumble along, getting it wrong time after time, and feel perfectly fine as long as we learn something each time. Continue reading

Remember the Paradox of Stress

Everyone has an Everest. Whether it’s a climb you chose, or a circumstance you find yourself in, you’re in the middle of an important journey. Can you imagine a climber scaling the wall of ice at Everest’s Lhotse face and saying, “This is such a hassle”? Or spending the first night in the mountain’s “death zone” and thinking, “I don’t need this stress”? Continue reading

Mindfulness in Plain English: 20th Anniversary Edition by Henepola Gunaratana

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Mindfulness in Plain English Quotes

“The irony of it is that real peace comes only when you stop chasing it—another Catch-22.”

“Patience is the key. Patience. If you learn nothing else from meditation, you will learn patience. Patience is essential for any profound change.”

“Buddhism advises you not to implant feelings that you don’t really have or avoid feelings that you do have. If you are miserable you are miserable; that is the reality, that is what is happening, so confront that. Look it square in the eye without flinching. When you are having a bad time, examine that experience, observe it mindfully, study the phenomenon and learn its mechanics. The way out of a trap is to study the trap itself, learn how it is built. You do this by taking the thing apart piece by piece. The trap can’t trap you if it has been taken to pieces. The result is freedom.”

“Pain is inevitable, suffering is not.”

Reviews

“A masterpiece.” (Jon Kabat-Zinn)

“A classic–one of the very best English sources for authoritative explanations of mindfulness.” (Daniel Goleman)

“Of great value to newcomers… especially people without access to a teacher.” (Larry Rosenberg, author of Breath by Breath)

“This book is the bible of mindfulness.” (Barry Boyce, editor of Mindful magazine and The Mindfulness Revolution)

“Wonderfully clear and straightforward.” (Joseph Goldstein, author of A Heart Full of Peace)

“Pithy and practical.” (Shambhala Sun)

“Jargon-free.” (USA Today)

An excellent book, clearly written, well-organized, and comprehensive. It describes a method by which you achieve meaningful meditation, including many helpful suggestions and descriptions of variations like walking meditation. It lists the many things that may occur as one meditates and suggests methods for dealing with each of these hindrances, treating most of them as useful objects for unattached observation. The reader is warned not to expect quick returns from meditation, but extols the benefits one can achieve from patience and practice. This is Vipassana meditation, which stresses concentration and mindfulness, living in the moment. If fully successful, it amounts to auto-psychoanalysis, discovering the deepest parts of oneself, good and bad, without judgment, allowing one to develop relationships of “loving friendliness” with others and enjoying a life lived in the moment.
– David N.Orth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Recommendation – Anger: Wisdom for Cooling the Flames by Thich Nhat Hanh

“When we get angry, we suffer. If you really understand that, you also will be able to understand that when the other person is angry, it means that she is suffering. When someone insults you or behaves violently towards you, you have to be intelligent enough to see that the person suffers from his own violence and anger. But we tend to forget. We think that we are the only one that suffers, and the other person is our oppressor. This is enough to make anger arise, and to strengthen our desire to punish. We want to punish the other person because we suffer. Then, we have anger in us; we have violence in us, just as they do. When we see that our suffering and anger are no different from their suffering and anger, we will behave more compassionately. So understanding the other is understanding yourself, and understanding yourself is understanding the other person. Everything must begin with you.”
― Thich Nhat Hanh, Anger

Continue reading