The One Power that illumines everything and everyone is indivisible

Not that which the eye can see, but that whereby the eye can see: know that to be Brahman the eternal, and not what people here adore;

Not that which the ear can hear, but that whereby the ear can hear: know that to be Brahman the eternal, and not what people here adore;

Not that which speech can illuminate, but that by which speech can be illuminated: know that to be Brahman the eternal, and not what people here adore;

Not that which the mind can think, but that whereby the mind can think: know that to be Brahman the eternal, and not what people here adore.

Kena Upanishad
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Where you stumble, there your treasure is…

“It seems a farmer was out working his field when his plow caught on something, and it wouldn’t budge. The horse reared up and the farmer cursed. After calming the horse the farmer yanked back on the braces. But the plow still wouldn’t budge. Because he was an impatient man his first reaction was to go into Judger. Had a rock or other obstacle broken his plowshare? That could mean losing at least two days’ work while he hauled the broken parts to the blacksmith! Cursing, he began digging around to free the plow. To his surprise, he discovered that it was caught on an iron ring buried six inches under the ground. After freeing his plow, the farmer got curious. He cleared away some of the dirt and pulled on the iron ring. Off came the lid of an ancient chest. He peeked down inside it. Before him, glittering in the sun, lay a treasure of precious jewels and gold.

Where you stumble, there your treasure is

This story reminds us that it is often by confronting our toughest obstacles that we find our greatest strengths and possibilities, but sometimes we’ve got to dig deep to find them. Campbell had a phrase for it: Where you stumble, there your treasure is.

To uncover that treasure you’d ask yourself questions like: What could I discover? What haven’t I noticed before? What might be valuable here?”

Change Your Questions, Change Your Life: 12 Powerful Tools for Leadership, Coaching, and Life by Marilee Adams and Marshall Goldsmith

Aristotles 12 Virtues

Aristotle’s 12 virtues are a great checklist to understand the different morals, values, and virtues that you could cultivate or restrain in your life. It’s like an ancient Greek personality test.

Moderation in all things, including moderation: Aristotle was clear that too much (excess) of any virtue is just as bad as lack (deficiency). You must find the mean, the right balance.

aristotle-12-virtues

Surrendering, Trusting, Allowing

‘The great secret of spiritual science is allowing something to happen without doing it. It needs great understanding and awareness to allow things to happen. No doing is required on our part, because whatever we do, we do out of our confused minds. It can’t be something really deep, because the mind itself is very shallow.Seeing this, understanding it, a new approach arises——the approach of letting go. The great secret of spiritual science is allowing something to happen without doing it. It needs great understanding and awareness to allow things to happen.

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Talking to the elephant in the room

Yes, we’re all doing stuff from our home offices. I don’t know what your office is like, but mine’s quite nice. I like it. Until I noticed a strange smell yesterday. Didn’t know what it was, so I had to look around the room a lot, then suddenly realised …

… there was an elephant in the room.

How the hell did I miss that?

I mean it’s huge!

How could you spend days, weeks, months, working in the home office and miss it?

How long has it been there? And what does it represent?

I didn’t know, so I asked it. Here’s how the conversation went.