Where you stumble, there your treasure is…

“It seems a farmer was out working his field when his plow caught on something, and it wouldn’t budge. The horse reared up and the farmer cursed. After calming the horse the farmer yanked back on the braces. But the plow still wouldn’t budge. Because he was an impatient man his first reaction was to go into Judger. Had a rock or other obstacle broken his plowshare? That could mean losing at least two days’ work while he hauled the broken parts to the blacksmith! Cursing, he began digging around to free the plow. To his surprise, he discovered that it was caught on an iron ring buried six inches under the ground. After freeing his plow, the farmer got curious. He cleared away some of the dirt and pulled on the iron ring. Off came the lid of an ancient chest. He peeked down inside it. Before him, glittering in the sun, lay a treasure of precious jewels and gold.

Where you stumble, there your treasure is

This story reminds us that it is often by confronting our toughest obstacles that we find our greatest strengths and possibilities, but sometimes we’ve got to dig deep to find them. Campbell had a phrase for it: Where you stumble, there your treasure is.

To uncover that treasure you’d ask yourself questions like: What could I discover? What haven’t I noticed before? What might be valuable here?”

Change Your Questions, Change Your Life: 12 Powerful Tools for Leadership, Coaching, and Life by Marilee Adams and Marshall Goldsmith

Aristotles 12 Virtues

Aristotle’s 12 virtues are a great checklist to understand the different morals, values, and virtues that you could cultivate or restrain in your life. It’s like an ancient Greek personality test.

Moderation in all things, including moderation: Aristotle was clear that too much (excess) of any virtue is just as bad as lack (deficiency). You must find the mean, the right balance.

aristotle-12-virtues

Be in the world but not of it…..

To be surrendered means to have no strong emotion about a thing: “It’s okay if it happens, and it’s okay if it doesn’t.” When we are free, there is a letting go of attachments. We can enjoy a thing, but we don’t need it for our happiness. There is progressive diminishing of dependence on anything or anyone outside of ourselves. These principles are in accord with the basic teaching of the Buddha to avoid attachment to worldly phenomena, as well as the basic teaching of Jesus Christ to “be in the world but not of it.”

David Hawkins

There is nothing to be done today but transform.

“The landscape that you exist in requires transformation. You cannot be the new person standing in the old kitchen looking at the old pots and pans that cooked yesterday’s dinner. Everything is made new in Christ. That is actually a promise in the Jesus teachings. “Behold, I make things new.” This is a promise that you are now in as well. Now the kitchen that you stand in with yesterday’s pots are still there, but they will be perceived anew. And then you will have to decide whether you want to wash your pots, replace your pots, or move to a new city where you have new pots or no pots at all. Your changes will be made clear to you through your own vocation, through your own knowing, through your own requirements for the life that you will live once you have changed into yourself more fully. There is nothing to be done today but transform.”

Paul Selig