Yes, I am changing

A  friend of mine crossed 45 years of age. I asked him what’s changing?  He sent me the following lines.

Yes, I am changing — After loving my parents, my siblings, my spouse, my children, my friends, now I have started loving myself.

Yes, I am changing —  I just realised that I am not “Atlas”. The world does not rest on my shoulders.

Yes, I am changing  —  I  now stopped bargaining with vegetables and fruits vendors.  After all, a few rupees more is not going to burn a hole in my pocket but it might help the poor fellow save for his daughter’s school fees.

Yes, I am changing  —  I pay the taxi driver without waiting for the change. The extra money might bring a smile on his face. After all he is toiling much harder for a living than me. Continue reading

Small Wins

“Small wins are a steady application of a small advantage, Once a small win has been accomplished, forces are set in motion that favour another small win.”

“Small wins fuel transformative changes by leveraging tiny advantages into patterns that convince people that bigger achievements are within reach.”

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
Charles Duhigg

சிறு துளி பெரு வெள்ளம் ( Little Drops Make the Mighty Ocean)

Radical Candor: Care Personally at the same time that you Challenge Directly

Image result for Radical Candor is a simple idea: to be a good boss, you have to Care Personally at the same time that you Challenge Directly. When you challenge without caring it’s obnoxious aggression; when you care without challenging it’s ruinous empathy. When you do neither it’s manipulative insincerity.

Radical Candor is a simple idea:

To be a good leader, you have to Care Personally at the same time that you Challenge Directly. 
When you challenge without caring it’s obnoxious aggression;
When you care without challenging it’s ruinous empathy.
When you do neither it’s manipulative insincerity.

Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity by [Scott, Kim]
(Book Recommended by Fanny L-W)

 

if you cling too strongly, then even when truth comes in person and knocks on your door, you will not open it

Image result for Thich Nhat HanhThe Buddha once told a story about a young man who was a trader and had a beautiful wife and baby son. Sadly, his wife fell ill and died, and the man poured all his love into his little child, who became the sole source of his happiness and joy.

Once while he went away on business, bandits raided his village, burned it to the ground and captured his five-year-old son. When he returned and saw the devastation, he was beside himself with grief. He found the charred corpse of a small child, and in his desperation, he took it for the body of his son. He tore at his hair and beat his chest, and wept uncontrollably. Continue reading