Evil spirits are only a reflection of one’s hatred and fear

When Pandavas were in the forest, Krishna visited them. The brothers told Krishna that they took turns during nights to keep a vigil and control the activities of evil spirits and demons. Yuddhistra tried to dissuade Krishna from participating in sentry duty, but Krishna insisted. During the Lord’s turn, no evil spirit appeared. Then came Arjuna, and Krishna watched him from a distance. To Arjuna’s surprise, no evil spirit appeared while Krishna was there. Krishna later explained to Arjuna that evil spirits were only a reflection of one’s hatred and fear, and when one is free from these, no evil spirit would appear or do any harm. Krishna revealed that the Divine existed even in the so-called evil spirits and that if a person gets rid of the evil qualities within him, the evil spirits cannot do any harm. Your anger assumes the form of a demon. If you develop love, everything you confront will have the form of love.

Meditazione sulla Luce (Sathya Sai Baba)

— Bhagawan Sri Sathya Sai Baba (Divine Discourse, Jan 14, 1998)

Anger is within me..

“A monk decides to meditate alone. Away from his monastery, he takes a boat and goes to the middle of the lake, closes his eyes and begins to meditate. After a few hours of unperturbed silence, he suddenly feels the blow of another boat hitting his. With his eyes still closed, he feels his anger rising and, when he opens his eyes, he is ready to shout at the boatman who dared to disturb his meditation.

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Book Recommendation – Anger: Wisdom for Cooling the Flames by Thich Nhat Hanh

“When we get angry, we suffer. If you really understand that, you also will be able to understand that when the other person is angry, it means that she is suffering. When someone insults you or behaves violently towards you, you have to be intelligent enough to see that the person suffers from his own violence and anger. But we tend to forget. We think that we are the only one that suffers, and the other person is our oppressor. This is enough to make anger arise, and to strengthen our desire to punish. We want to punish the other person because we suffer. Then, we have anger in us; we have violence in us, just as they do. When we see that our suffering and anger are no different from their suffering and anger, we will behave more compassionately. So understanding the other is understanding yourself, and understanding yourself is understanding the other person. Everything must begin with you.”
― Thich Nhat Hanh, Anger

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