Gift of Confusion

Article from our new sister website http://www.giftofconfusion.org

……Confusion or the feeling of being lost or stuck are not necessarily bad places to be. In a world that seems to praise being right and certain above all else it is easy for us to feel uncomfortable with confusion but if we embrace it, welcome it and pay attention to the nudges it creates in one direction or another we can use it as a signpost toward a better outcome. Confusion can be a huge opportunity for learning and growth. It is not a weakness. As long as we use it to listen to the questions it forces us to ask ourselves and take heed of the answers it can be a profound strength. In essence, confusion is simply an invitation to change. An invitation to be more flexible between what our rational mind may decide it ‘wants’ and what the heart whispers that it ‘needs’. It is an invitation to step back and embrace the unfolding nature of life…..

https://www.giftofconfusion.org/articles/article-2-how-it-started-gift-of-confusion?fbclid=IwAR3DOZlfG178TUPCJQkl8lSNLjQD06GjyMcjnVqH3vPMbYiDdByJOqMMrYY

 

So why do we spend so much of our limited time on this earth focusing on all the things our eulogy will never cover?

Have you noticed that when we die, our eulogies celebrate our lives very differently from the way society defines success?

It’s easy, in effect, to miss the real point of our lives even as we’re living them. Until we’re no longer alive. A eulogy is often the first formal marking down of what our lives were about—the foundational document of our legacy.

Our eulogies are always about the other stuff: what we gave, how we connected, how much we meant to our family and friends, small kindnesses, lifelong passions, and the things that made us laugh.

Living the best version of our Eulogy

So why do we spend so much of our limited time on this earth focusing on all the things our eulogy will never cover?

“Eulogies aren’t résumés, they describe the person’s care, wisdom, truthfulness and courage. They describe the million little moral judgments that emanate from that inner region.”

– David Brooks

Even for those who die with amazing Wikipedia entries, whose lives were synonymous with accomplishment and achievement, their eulogies focus mostly on what they did when they weren’t achieving and succeeding. They aren’t bound by our current, broken definition of success….

Whether you believe in an afterlife—as I do—or not, by being fully present in your life and in the lives of those you love, you’re not just writing your own eulogy; you’re creating a very real version of your afterlife. It’s an invaluable lesson—one that has much more credence while we have the good fortune of being healthy and having the energy and freedom to create a life of purpose and meaning. The good news is that each and every one of us still has time to live up to the best version of our eulogy.

Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder – Arianna Huffington

Keeping Quiet by Pablo Neruda

Now we will count to twelve

and we will all keep still
for once on the face of the earth,
let’s not speak in any language;
let’s stop for a second,
and not move our arms so much.

It would be an exotic moment
without rush, without engines;
we would all be together
in a sudden strangeness.

Power of keeping Quiet

Photo by Retha Ferguson

Fishermen in the cold sea
would not harm whales
and the man gathering salt
would not look at his hurt hands.

Those who prepare green wars,
wars with gas, wars with fire,
victories with no survivors,
would put on clean clothes
and walk about with their brothers
in the shade, doing nothing.

What I want should not be confused
with total inactivity.
Life is what it is about;
I want no truck with death.

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